Poetry is Bottoming Out

The NEA says we’re reading more fiction but less poetry. 

The dismal poetry findings stand in sharp contrast not only to the rise in general fiction reading, but also to the efforts of the country’s many poetry-advocacy organizations, which for the past dozen years have been creating programs to attract larger audiences. These programs are at least in part a response to the growing sense that poetry is being forgotten in the U.S. They include National Poetry Month (April); readings, lectures and contests held across the country; initiatives to get poems into mainstream publications such as newspapers; and various efforts to boost poetry’s presence online (poets.org, the Web site of the Academy of American Poets, even launched a mobile version optimized for use on the iPhone). Yet according to the NEA report, in 2008, just 8.3 percent of adults had read any poetry in the preceding 12 months. That figure was 12.1 percent in 2002, and in 1992, it was 17.1 percent, meaning the number of people reading poetry has decreased by approximately half over the past 16 years.

Sunil Iyengar, the NEA’s director of the Office of Research and Analysis, says the agency can’t answer with certainty why fewer adults are reading poetry. He and others believed the opposite would be true, largely because of poetry’s expansion onto the Internet. “In fact,” he says, “part of our surmise as to why fiction reading rates seem to be up might be due to greater opportunities through online reading. But we don’t know why with poetry that’s not the case.”

they later hit on what I side with. A lot of poetry is just bad. The stuff has more outlets than it did but I’m an English major, an amateur poet (admittedly poor), and reader myself and I have a hard time finding the determination to bother reading any new poetry I come across. But at least people are reading fiction again. Go Fiction

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