Posts Tagged ‘library’

Book Links

October 23, 2013

9 Books to scare the hell out of you. A good list with some I didn’t expect. I still have a hard time seeing lists like this with an array of newer titles while leaving anything by King, Rice, Matheson, etc. off. I know The Shining can only be on so many lists, and newer works deserve (and need) the exposure, but it’s still a bit weird for me. Nice seeing Shirley Jackson get some much deserved love, though. Despite her greatness, I think she gets overlooked at times.

 

Irma Boom: objectification of the book. I love books as physical objects, and Boom takes this to wonderful places. If you don’t know her work, check it out. You will enjoy it.

 

Libraries of the Rich and Famous.  I love the clutter of Keith Richard’s library, but I think Woody Allen’s tastes would most mirror my own. If I was filthy rich, that is.

 

We don’t read as well as we used to.  A new study from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development shows that American adults had a lower reading proficiency than their counterparts from twenty years ago.  It’s a bit of a thing that “young adult” books are becoming increasingly popular with adults, that it is common to see someone with some salt in their beard or grey in their hair lugging around Twilight or The Hunger Games, and it’s always assumed it’s because young adult fiction is becoming so well done. Maybe it’s because more and more people can’t handle more difficult reads.  This isn’t to say young adult novels are bad, but they are not really difficult, either. Anyway. There is my moment of fire in a crowded theater for this post.

Finally, David Bowie has a list of 100 must read books.

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Book Links 2/7/13

February 7, 2013

Alright, I’m trying to get back on the horse and start posting again. I have three or four reviews partially written, and I’ve been accumulating links in my bookmarks. The past week or so has just been a mess for me, though. Partly it’s an actual, physical mess.  The apartment is a random jumble of papers and detritus. We’re in the midst of a hopeful soon move, trying to buy a house on a short sale and waiting for a couple of banks to sort their stuff out. So an impending possible move just sort of looms in the background, along with an assortment of partially filled plastic totes and milk crates.  I’ve also had maintenance lounging about my bathroom for the past few days, tearing out about a two foot square section of bathroom wall to fix some plumbing and then trying to put the wall back together again. They need some more knights and men to help them, though. Just took a look at the job after the maintenance guy went on lunch, and it’s a lot of grout held together with some porcelain.  I think the guy is trying really hard to make it look decent, though. I get the feeling he doesn’t have a lot of experience with tiling. Anyway, some links…

Barnes & Noble has been getting some attention this week. Atlantic has up what is essentially a love letter and plea not to leave. Please evolve with the times but also keep all of your brick and mortar stores open! Yeah, I hope they can, despite not enjoying their stores as much as I enjoyed Borders, but I think it’s unrealistic. I think our hope has to be that B&N can keep a fair amount of stores open in the majority of urban areas, but not be a ubiquitous presence. At the same time, Forbes is playing the role of guy with a placard beside the road foretelling the end is nigh. They close with the oft repeated, “innovate or die.” It’s true, it’s necessary, but I really just don’t want to read doom and gloom pieces for awhile. It’s probably my own version of the confidence fairy, but I worry that our prognostications will have a bad habit of making themselves come true. In the meantime, go and shop at brick and mortar stores. It’s worth it. I just bought a collection of Jules Verne stories the other day, and it’s a pretty book and my kid likes it. It’s just far more enjoyable to pick these things out in person than to order it and have it show up in the mail.

The LA Times has a google hangout video with George Saunders up. I’m not a huge Saunders fan, though it’s changing a bit with his latest collection (more on that later this week)(hopefully), but this interview is enjoyable. If you’re fan, or if you’re not, give it a look.

Finally, flavorwire has 11 of the coolest museum libraries. In my dreams, my house would have all of them contained within its walls. My house would be a museum library.

Book Links 10-4-12

October 4, 2012

EContent has a good article about YA publishing and its ability to cross barriers to bigger audiences.  I’ve tried, but I just can’t find YA lit overly interesting. I know this is going to sound disparaging, but I’ve tried Hunger Games, I’ve tried Potter, etc. and I just don’t feel engaged by it. Still, if you’re looking for a place to write and make money in, YA definitely seems like the destination to be.
Over at BookRiot there is an article about the Musashino University Library in Tokyo. Not much to say, just a neat library to look at. They need to fill more of those shelves, though!

On a similar note, here’s a collection of home libraries from dornob. I thought my wife and I had a lot of books, but these folks put us to shame. Check it out, be envious.

Microsoft and B&N complete Nook Media. I will admit that I’m not entirely sure where this is going to go, but I find it interesting none the less. while Amazon and Apple have an all-in-one thing going with their own devices and stores, B&N and Microsoft have teamed up to (apparently) provide a similar service. Considering my distaste for Amazon, and my too thin wallet for Apple, I’m probably on MS/B&N’s side here. I prefer the Nook ereaders to the Kindles, and I really like the idea behind the surface tablets (though the possible price tags for the “pro” edition are a bit of a stumble for me).

Book Links 9-14-12

September 14, 2012

Hard to improve on the original title, Authors Behaving Badly.  Scary stuff that I, frankly, don’t understand. Yeah, we all love what we do, and it hurts like hell to hear someone else say that they don’t. It still doesn’t give you the right to assault them.  Just seriously not cool. Hope the agent is recovering well.
Popular science lets us know that literature is good for our brain. Well, yeah. Though I’m not sure they should have a picture with an Ayn Rand novel in it for the article. I guess it goes to show that any literature has to have some benefits.
The New York Times has an interview with Nicholson Baker. I like the guy’s books, so I’m putting it up here.

Some good news on the book buying front: sales at bookstores went up in July. I’m not sure it’s so much a sign of people going to bookstores rather than Amazon or if it’s just another sign of the economy turning around. I’m betting the latter.

And it looks like we know where publishers are going to try to make their money back if Amazon is going to slash prices. Hachette has “bumped” their prices to library’s by 220% for ebooks. I can sort of get Random House’s limiting downloads, though 26 seems way WAY too low. Someone somewhere has to have an idea of how many times a book is typically taken out of a library before they have to buy a new copy, and that number has to be far higher than 26. Find that number and use that. And just charge them what you’d charge them for a typical hardbound copy. Libraries is one of the last institutions we should financially plunder.